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The Pulse of Entertainment: Executive Lena Jenkins-Smith to Launch ‘The Young Hustle’ Series App

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Entertainment executive Lena Jenkins-Smith launches ‘The Young Hustle’ series.

*“It’s like ‘Teen Summit’ only to a broader audience,” said Lena Jenkins-Smith executive producer of the new Internet based series “The Young Hustle.” “There are interviews to address different topics. It’s cool…a platform. We are putting the series out one show at a time.”

The much needed outlet for young “millenniums” follows the hustle of young entrepreneurs. Not new to filmmaking Lena’s credits include executive producer of Primetime Emmy Award winning comedian/actor Katt Williams’ Stand-up Specials, which include “The Pimp Chronicles Pt. 1” (HBO), “Katt Williams: Priceless Afterlife” (HBO), “Katt Williams: Kattpacalypse” (Showtime), and “Katt Williams: Great America” (Netflix) – to name a few.

“Katt started my career in entertainment. He showed me the ropes,” said Jenkins-Smith who was a teacher before Katt hired her to be his assistant. She went on to be his tour manager and executive producer on this special film projects. “In a male dominated industry most men are not trying to set you up…let you know the secrets. He even gave me credit and accolades that I never received before. It was…a long time learning from one of the best in the industry. It was important to get recognized for what I had done. He’s funny but kept me on my toes, he made me stronger.”

I’d like to give Katt Williams (Friday After Next, Repo), who has always given me interviews when asked, the credit he deserved for sharing the wealth, and I am not talking about dollar wealth. For me, knowledge is wealth. With that wealth of experience and knowledge Lena has gone on to do outstanding work for herself. She went on to form Young Millennium Records releasing her son’s work, a 17 year-old Inglewood, California rapper named Cyrus who now resides in Atlanta. The imprint went on to sign two other artists Camryn Levert, 22 year-old daughter of Gerald Levert – an R&B singer from Vegas, and Kallie Rock, a 26 year-old Pop singer from Orlando, Florida. Lena has even added author to her credits with a book release on racism in inner-city communities titled “Uncolored” (Book Baby Publishing, @Amazon).

“My son is one of the artists, Cyrus,” Jenkins-Smith said about her label. “He was the 1st signed. I got Camryn, Gerald Levert’s daughter. She is more Pop, an amazing artist. That’s all I have time for right now.”

Lena, who has two other children, informed me that “The Young Hustle” series basically shares the journey of young entrepreneurs that are using online technology to make money so they can inspire others.

“It’s a kids based showcase…it has a teen artist game-show component. It shows young entrepreneurs not giving up…it shows what they go through. It’s like using Tik Tok. An app, but a teen show,” Lena explained. www.CyrusSmith.com www.Uncolored.world

SYNDICATED COLUMN: Eunice Moseley, MS, MBA, MPhil has an estimated weekly readership of over ¼ million with The Pulse of Entertainment. She is also a Public Relations Strategist and Business Management Consultant at Freelance Associates, and is Promotions Director (at-large) for The Baltimore Times. www.ThePulseofEntertainment.com. EVENTS: “Uplifting Minds II” Entertainment Conference (ULMII), founded by Eunice in 1999, is into its 21st year. Next events are coming to Los Angeles Saturday, November 7, 2020 via Zoom Video Conferencing and to Baltimore Saturday April 17, 2021 at Security Square Mall. The ULMII event is a free conference offering an Entertainment Business Panel Q&A Session, a Talent Showcase and Talent Competition (vocal, songwriting, dance and acting) where aspiring artists have a chance to receive over $15,000 valued in prizes/product/services.  Log onto www.UpliftingMinds2.com for more information or to RSVP for Zoom Access email [email protected]

www.GoFundMe.com/Uplifting-Minds-II-Entertainment-Conference

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‘Billie’: New Doc Follows Both Holliday and the Meticulous Biographer Who Died Before Revealing Her Findings (Trailer)

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’12 Years a Slave’ Screenwriter John Ridley Exposes ‘The Other History of the DC Universe’ with Black Lightning

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*Step into the DC Universe and history awaits. So much history. So many iconic heroes and villains. Yet only one side of the story.

Until now.

Oscar-winning screenwriter John Ridley is opening a new door into the familiar backdrop with his new comic book offering, “The Other History of the DC Universe.” As the name implies, Ridley shines a light on different perspectives of the iconic moments of DC history, from the eyes of heroes of color.

‘The Other History of the DC Universe” kicks off with Jefferson Pierce, a.k.a. Black Lightning for its first issue. The inclusion of Black Lightning was a no brainer to Ridley, whose view of comics changed with seeing the hero on the cover of Justice League #173. The sight of Black Lightning talking to members of the legendary Justice League proved to Ridley that someone like him could exist in the same world as the superhero elite.

“I love comics. I read comics, but I remember the first time I saw Black Lightning as a hero. When I went to the comic book shop, this was mid-’70’s and I was young. But I had to pull back,” Ridley, a longtime comic book fan, recalled while speaking at a media roundtable to promote “The Other History of the DC Universe” about his fateful trip to purchase comics the week he was introduced to Black Lightning.  “And I remember getting that bag that week and honestly, I remember like it was yesterday, and spilling the bag out and going through them and seeing Black Lightning and seeing a hero who looked like me, was a teacher like my mother was. That was really, really impactful for me.”

MORE NEWS: Black Santa on Lawn Draws Racist Letter from Anonymous Neighbor (Watch)

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Oscar-winning screenwriter John Ridley

Anchored by Ridley, “The Other History of the DCU Universe,” features artists Giuseppe “Cammo” Camuncoli, Andrea Cucchi, and colorist José Villarrubia. Covers for the five-issue bimonthly DC Black Label miniseries were constructed by Camuncoli (with Marco Mastrazzo) and Jamal Campbell. “The Other History of the DC Universe” marks Ridley’s latest venture into the world of comics after finding success outside the genre as a screenwriter with critically-acclaimed and award-winning work in film (“12 Years a Slave”), television (ABC’s “American Crime,” Showtime’s “Guerilla”).

Despite his good fortune in other areas, Ridley’s love of comics and Black Lightning remained as the country transitioned into its current state of strained race relations, a divided political climate and efforts for more diversity. Coupled with frequent protests, the arrival of “The Other History of the DC Universe” couldn’t come at a better time. For the project, Ridley played it close to his heart by selecting heroes “that meant something to me when I was growing up,” while paying respect to DC’s history and readers.

“I didn’t want to do a made-up history of the DC universe. I didn’t want to go through and say, ‘I don’t care about what happened before. This is John Ridley’s version of it.,’ said Ridley. “Honestly, I wanted a reaction…where a fan will look at moments and go, ‘Omigosh, I remember that.’ Here’s some different context.’ It wasn’t about saying the past doesn’t equal the moment that we live in. It was saying we’re here for a reason. We’re here because we’re fans.”

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Jefferson Pierce, a.k.a. Black Lightning

Ridley’s inspiration for “The Other History of the DC Universe” is more personal as each issue reflects the essence of storytelling, with someone telling their version of what happened while relaying their thoughts on how events affected them. With Black Lightning, readers experience his interaction with the Justice League and the world’s view of those with superpowers he felt focused more on worldwide threats than what was going on in his hometown.

“Here’s Black Lightning giving a version of an oral history, saying ‘Yeah, I remember that moment too,’ But it may be a little bit different than an individual would contextualize it, different readers,” Ridley stated. “But also what’s interesting about the series for me is that we also revisit moments from other characters that have a shared moment and may remember it completely differently than Jefferson Pierce did or feel differently about it or feel differently about Jeff Pierce. About, you know, why are you always this way. So for me, more than anything, it was trying to treat these stories as an oral history and getting the reaction that you have.”

Reflecting on stories he heard from his parents, Ridley recounted how moments shared were “were real heartbreak.”

“My dad was in the Air Force. They were all about service. And yet, there were moments where they were treated as just black people. But when we hear stories from people, when people share stories, if you have an ounce of empathy in you, you can hear that pain, that joy, that heartache, heartbreak. The inspiration that comes from an individual. Those stories, again, if you have the slightest ounce of empathy in you, the slightest capacity to see yourself in others, those stories mean much more,” Ridley added. “We definitely could’ve done the other history of the DC universe where it was just about big action moment and here’s Black Lightning just being a hero. Those are great stories because all of these folks are heroes in these stories. But I wanted to try to treat them as though you were listening to your uncle, your brother, your aunt, your sister, your cousin tell these stories in their own voices with their own perspectives and make them in some ways oral histories and so that it wasn’t just about these, a series of giant moments. But these were lives that were being shared. These were perspectives that were being shared.”

Black Lightning’s oral history isn’t the only one readers will be privy to. “Other heroes giving their side of “The Other History of the DC Universe” include Mal Duncan a.k.a. Herald and his wife, Karen Beecher (Bumblebee), Renee Montoya (the Question), Tatsu Yamashiro (Katana) and Black Lightning’s daughter Anissa, a.k.a Thunder.

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Tatsu Yamashiro a.k.a. Katana

“There were many characters that I wanted to try to include. For example, in the first issue, Mari McCabe, Vixen, I did not see the story as having her own story. But there was no way that you could not have Vixen in this series, that her appearances were not just a one and done. There was an arc to it. That is Jefferson Pierce being myopic and underestimating her. I thought that was really important that it wasn’t just characters of color railing against the prevailing culture all the time. Jefferson is a black man of a certain age, with a certain concept of Mari, what she could do and what she couldn’t do. And the next thing, she’s working with Superman. She’s big-time,” Ridley said while highlighting notable appearances from Vixen and John Stewart, one of the most popular Green Lanterns in the comics.

“So his [Black Lightning’s] relationship with John Stewart. A lot of people were like, ‘How could you not have John Stewart?’ John Stewart was always gonna be a part of it. but again, Jefferson’s relation to John and their reconciliation. I wanted to have a very human end.”

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Green Lantern John Stewart, appearing in the pages of John Ridley’s “The Other History of the DC Universe”

The views of black heroes only scratch the surface of “The Other History of the DC Universe.” As much attention is paid to Renee Montoya, a Latinx police officer, as well as Tatsu Yamashiro, a Japanese national living in America during the ‘80s, Ridley made sure these characters’ stories were given their due, adding another layer to his latest opus.

“With Tatsu Yamashiro (Katana), I remember in the ’80s, when America was at its height of anti-Japanese xenophobia. What’s it like for a Japanese national coming to America in the ’80s,” Ridley explained about Yamashiro. “And on the one hand, there are other people who look at her as a hero when she is in costume. There are other people who look at her as a menace when she’s just walking around.

“Renee had to be in it. You want to talk about a character who just started as a minor character in ‘Batman: The Animated Series’ and is now one of the most durable characters in the DC Universe? And played The Question at one point, my all-time favorite character, The Question. So she was gonna be in it. Always,” he continued about his reasons for including Montoya. But also Latinx, a police officer. You know, this series started before our current reckoning on race and police. To tell a story from a police officer’s point of view, who’s Latinx, who’s closeted, who believes in law and order but is also commenting on things like the LA uprising and what that means to her as a police officer.”

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Renee Montoya a.k.a. The Question

Coming back to Black Lightning,” Ridley examined another side of the hero with his daughter Anissa. The young heroine’s point of view is one that differs at times from her father’s, which is shown in the first issue.

“I just thought it was really important to try to bookend this series with a father and daughter. And there are things that you will see in Anissa’s story that goes back in common with what you have seen or read in the very first issue. And again, Jefferson pierce as a human being and things that she has missed, things that he deals with as a man of a certain age. And some of them positive, some of them, I wouldn’t say slightly negative, but certainly representative of a myopia that we see in the black community,” Ridley told the round table. “So it was not just again trying to pick up the characters from column A and column B. the characters that I felt a connection to because I felt like I had seen them grow up over a certain space and time. They had been part of my life. And wanting to be very honorific with the work the creators had done in the past having them arrive in this space.”

Furthering the diversity, Ridley included Duncan and Beecher in to the mix, knowing a couple with different views of the same happening would be a fun aspect to play with.

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Mal Duncan a.k.a. Herald and his wife, Karen Beecher a.k.a. Bumblebee

“It was very important that in this story, we were going to have at least one that was a black couple who were in love, who were sharing their story together. Also, because I thought it would be fun for a couple to…it was kind of ‘The Newlywed Game.’ ‘Wait. What? How do you remember that? No, that wasn’t how it happened.”

As the series examines unique views from its roster of heroes, it’s worth noting each issue takes place around the time the heroes were created by DC. According to Ridley, the time frame ranges from the ’70s to the early 2000s, a period that supports Ridley’s intent to create a real timeline and add weight to each character’s story.

“It was really important to me because I did think it added to the verisimilitude, it added to the reality to say that Jefferson Pierce is only gonna live in a certain amount of time. When the story ends or wherever he be found, he’d be roughly my age,” he said about placing Black Lightning in the ‘’70s. ”The stories begin essentially and I think you see in the issues, they all have timelines on them. I think roughly ‘77 to ’90-something. Technically, it’s a little bit earlier because he is in the Olympics in 1972. But if he was a decathlete, he would’ve been in the ’72 games. He would’ve been around the Munich massacre. What does that mean for him as a person? What does that mean for a guy who wanted to be better because he lost his father and at the games where was going to show what an amazing human specimen he is. it means nothing, compared to the loss of those Israeli athletes.

The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Olympics, involving members of the Palestinian terrorist group Black September. The incident resulted in the deaths of 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team, who were taken hostage by Black September.

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Black Lightning in action as Superman looks from above in the first issue of John Ridley’s “The Other History of the DC Universe.”

“So I wanted those true timelines. Tatsu for example, coming around in the ’80s. What would that mean for a Japanese national? What would it mean for Renée to be a cop in the ’90s,” he added. “We treat it as a timeline. It was important to me because it helps makes these characters and their stories as real

Speaking to EURweb’s Lee Bailey, a humble Ridley welcomed the possibility of ‘The Other History of the DC Universe” crossing over into film as a way for his story to be seen by more people.

“I will say this. I have been very, very fortunate. Obviously, I work in film and I work in television and I continue to do so. So for me, writing a graphic novel was the endgame. It was so special and its’ such precious real estate. I mean I can’t lie. Even if somebody came back and this was successful enough and they said, ‘Hey, we would like to try and make it into a movie or a series or something like that…who doesn’t want to try to reach as many people as humanly possible, said Ridley. “But for me, because I am lucky enough to work in other spaces, it wasn’t about, ‘Oh this only is going to be fun or enjoyable or impactful for me if they make it into a movie. No, I mean the fact that this is going to be out, people are going to, within the confines of the Covid world we live in, go somewhere, purchase it, get it to read it, talk about it, love it, hate it. You know, embrace it. And whatever those things that people do with any issue, I get to be part of that. That is so special, in and of itself. If that is all that happens to it. I could not be more fortunate.”

The first issue of John Ridley’s “The Other History of the DC Universe” is on sale now. The second issue of the miniseries will be available on January 26, 2021.

 

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Guest Lecturer and Historian Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs Launches the More Than a Fraction Foundation

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Guest Lecturer and Historian Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs.

*Guest Lecturer and Historian Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs establishes the More Than a Fraction Foundation with a mission to expand research and education on the history, life, culture, and experiences of “involuntary migrated” Africans in America and African-Americans, before the Civil War and a decade after under the mantle “from separation to reunification.” The Foundation seeks to do this by approaching the subject from an “Africans in America” and African-American centric view, promoting new angles of research from innovative lenses and focal points. The More Than a Fraction Foundation’s initial focus is on those within and connected to the Appalachian region.

“More Than a Fraction” is also the title of a creative non-fiction book published by Dr. Moseley-Hobbs in 2017, after she researched into her African-American heritage and her ancestors – the Fractions. The documented records led her to the Smithfield plantation in Virginia where she learned her people, the Fractions, are part of the history of Virginia Tech University. The Foundation’s partners in upcoming projects include Virginia Tech University, Historic Smithfield Museum, and the Virginia Governor’s Executive Mansion. Through its website at www.MoreThanaFraction.org, supporters can get more information, sign up for the monthly newsletter, and find ways to donate to support the Foundation’s current ad upcoming projects.

Requests for Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs to present her research into the Fraction family, who were involuntarily migrated to America, and various other enslaved groups living on the Smithfield and Solitude plantations in Virginia have been steady. She also offers, mainly for museums, a Traveling African Artifacts Exhibit. During that presentation she explains the history and uses for various Africans artifacts and show how some are still used today, and a lot have been woven into the culture of America. In her work, Dr. Moseley-Hobbs also explores reconciliation, and assist with the interpretation of Africa American history by finding and using resources that provide innovative point of views.

Dr. Moseley-Hobbs recently gave a guest lecture for the Civil War Studies Center at Virginia Tech University via Zoom and spoke at a panel at Historic Smithfield Museum on America’s denial of its horrible history. She has spoken at public libraries, museums, cultural centers, and universities.

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Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs during a Lecture via Zoom.

One upcoming project of the More Than a Fraction Foundation is to memorialize the Merry Tree located on the grounds of the Historic Smithfield Museum, where for approximately 250 years it served as the meeting space for various groups of people in the area from the 18th Century to present day. The event is slated for October 6, 2021 and will offer historical documented research and entertainment related to the 18th and early 19th Century eras that include, aside from Dr. Kerri Moseley-Hobbs’ presentation of her historical finds, the Virginia State University Gospel Choir performing traditional and Spiritual songs of the Africa Methodist Episcopal Church; West African dance performances; West African drumming performances; the Wake Forrest Community with historical information on the West African culture and the transatlantic slave trade and the emancipation; Historic Smithfield Museum with the history of the Preston family, who owned the plantations that were eventually donated to form Virginia Tech University, and on those Europeans who colonized the area; a Virginia Tech professor with the history of the Merry Tree, and a presentation by the American Indian and Indigenous Community Center on this history and culture of the American Indian and Indigenous community in the area of the Merry Tree.

Log onto www.MoreThanaFraction.org and browse through the platform to see how you can help document the African-American heritage and culture in America.

# # #

Freelance Associates

Contact: Eunice Moseley

Long Beach, CA 90807

Off: (562) 424-3836

E-mail: [email protected]

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